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The Campaign Ads That Will Defeat Obama

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

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An Obama campaign based heavily on gaffes and primary attacks on Romney will backfire, because the president’s own gaffes and 2008 primary low points are far more damaging. While Romney keeps his focus on the economy and national security, the Republican National Committee and SuperPACs could help him enormously by producing campaign ads on scandals and blunders suppressed by the media, including the following:

1) Hillary’s Warning about Obama’s Secret Promise to a Foreign Government

In a virtually forgotten scandal of 2008, the Obama campaign got caught promising Canadian officials the opposite of what he was pledging to primary voters. Hillary Clinton tried in vain to warn Americans about this revealing instance of duplicity that would be repeated in Obama’s overheard whispered promise to Russian President Medvedev.

2) “Nazi” 1950s USA? A Presidential Candidate Mangles History

Obama’s characterization of Eisenhower-era America as closely resembling Nazism has been covered up by the same media that spent days mocking Sarah Palin over her Paul Revere comment (even though she was neither a candidate nor an officeholder) and defining Michele Bachmann as a moron for a mistake about Concord, New Hampshire.

This stunning comment from 2001 takes on new significance in light of a recent email to Democratic donors warning that Romney would return us to “a social agenda from the 1950s.” While the injustices inflicted on African-Americans in those days must never be forgotten, “Nazi” America means an America with death camps, a claim as insane as Rev. Wright’s recently informing an adoring overflow audience that Israel is “genocidal.”

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