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I’m scared of the world

Written on Thursday, August 2, 2012 by

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The days I’m the happiest are the days that all I put on the TV are episodes of Yo Gabba Gabba for my daughter.  That show makes it impossible for you to be anything but ecstatic.  It’s fluff at its fluffiest.  The most troubling topic I’ve seen on the show is the issue of biting.  Brobee sings, “Friends are your friends, so don’t bite your friends!”  But, as soon as I switch over to Matt Lauer on Today, which by the way is supposed to be a happy, light (fluffy) take on current events, I hear about the Causeway Cannibal biting someone’s face off.  Brobee’s song isn’t so cute anymore.   Then, the local news cuts in about a stabbing that happened at my Walmart last night – only days after the Colorado massacre.  I just can’t get away from it.

 

Honestly, I would probably be content to shut the world out for the rest of my life and have only tinkly, happy music and episodes of Seinfeld playing in a loop on my TV, but there are two problems with that.  Number one, I have a one year old who I’m going to send off into this world someday, and if I cower in fear of everyone and everything, what hope am I giving her?  Number two, and most importantly, if I really am a follower of Christ and I hide in my house with Brobee and Foofa singing “Don’t bite your friends,” all day instead of getting into the world and loving the people who have been bitten by their friends, I’m disobeying Christ’s most important command. 
“He answered, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind’; and, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’” Luke 10:27. This doesn’t mean I feel compelled to rush back to the movie theater, though.  My husband’s gone twice since the shooting.  By himself.

 

Last election, I voted against Obama.   I didn’t study or care much about his economic plan because I was poor, so the higher taxes didn’t affect my bracket.  Did I care about politics?  No.  Did I know anything about tax issues or foreign policy?  Nope.  All I knew was that I was a Christian and my parents told me that Republicans were our best bet. I cared about electing someone who would lead our country in a way that would honor God, the way our founding fathers did.

 

My mom told me “Young people don’t care about politics because they’re too busy raising kids, and chasing careers, but when you’re old and your life is ending and you have time to look at what’s happening in the world, that’s when you start caring.”  She always encouraged me to be vigilant and take a stand because young people have all the power in this world, and most young people don’t do anything with it, because they don’t care.

 

Even if we disagree with liberals, even if we are against the crumbling of capitalism, even if our position is conservative, we choose to be wishy-washy.  We somehow convince ourselves that being wishy-washy is nothing like being “tolerant.”  We don’t want to offend our twitter followers.  We want people to like us.  But, if that’s our motivation for taping our mouths shut on political and religious issues that need to be addressed, maybe we don’t understand what’s at stake.

 

It’s our lives.  It’s our freedom to meet in our dorm rooms for a Bible study.  It’s writing a blog post telling the world our opinions on gun control, in lieu of the recent shooting.  It’s my bouncy, little daughters first day of Kindergarten.  Will she be allowed to pray before she eats her goldfish at snack time?

 

We can’t obliterate evil and corruption.  That’s impossible, but if we’re informed, and if we’re bold, we can make a difference as big as electing a president who takes our country back toward its foundation – one nation, under GOD, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

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