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Thoughts from the WWII National Memorial

Written on Monday, May 28, 2012 by

ww2article

During a recent trip to Washington, my PolitiChicks crew followed me around the World War II National Memorial, getting footage for an upcoming piece for our website.

Almost the moment I stepped onto the property I was a little shocked at the intense feelings I had, as all my maternal instincts kicked into first gear.

Over and over I kept thinking, “These were just kids!”  They were my son’s age and younger.  They had their entire lives ahead of them and they knew the risk they were taking–knew they might never come home.  And sadly more than 400,000 of these young men never did.

When you walk onto the grounds of the memorial the first thing you notice are 56 giant wreath-covered pillars representing the states, territories and the District of Columbia at the time of the war.  Flanked at each end of the memorial are 43-foot arches representing the war’s Atlantic and Pacific theaters.

But the thing that really got to me was the wall of 4,000 stars.  Each of those stars represents 100 U.S. soldiers who were killed during the war.

“Here we mark the price of freedom”—and what a cost it was.

I thought of all the mothers and fathers and sisters and brothers who lost their loved ones; and I thought of my own son.  It all made me realized how very delicate our freedom really is–how easily it can be lost, and the cost it takes to maintain it.

There are only three things I would willingly die for:  my faith, my family and my country.  I love America; I am so proud to live in such an exceptional country and I thank God for the brave men and women who continue to fight for us in order to keep us all free.

“Row Upon Row” by ThreeStrand:

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