Maybe I am just old-fashioned, but watching pornography on the Internet during working hours does not seem to me a legitimate activity for government employees. I am also fairly sure that working Americans would be less than pleased to learn that their tax dollars are being used to pay idle federal bureaucrats to spend the day indulging their sexual fantasies. Think this is bad? It gets worse. When these bored bureaucrats were questioned by investigators they justified their idle behavior by claiming they watched porn on the job out of boredom. It seems these bureaucratic perverts have no work to do. This situation raises several issues.

First there is the obvious issue of federal employees spending their days watching Internet porn rather than working. Then there is the issue of why these people are on the federal payroll in the first place if they have no work to do. Finally, there is the absurdity that a federal employee thinks the fact he has no work to do is a legitimate excuse for spending his days watching Internet porn. How entitled and out of touch can an individual be? There seems to be no realization on the part of the bureaucrats involved in this situation that taxpayers might take exception to them: 1) watching Internet porn at work; and 2) being retained on the payroll when there is no work to do.

As to the first issue—watching Internet porn on the job—the bureaucrats in question should be fired, period. As to the second issue—no work to do—I suspect there are a lot of bureaucrats on the payroll who have little to do, bureaucrats whose jobs should, therefore, be eliminated. Actually, this is a claim that can be safely made without the need for investigation since so much of what the federal government does exceeds its Constitutional authority and, therefore, should not be done in the first place. Because the burgeoning federal government has grown so far beyond the limits placed on it by our Founders, it stands to reason that we have bureaucrats performing jobs that are not needed and, therefore, should not even exist.

So how widespread is this problem? Writing for The Washington Times of August 4, 2014, Jim McElhatton had this to say about the issue of bored bureaucrats watching Internet porn on the job: “Lack of work has emerged time and again in federal investigations, and it’s not just porn, not is it confined to the FCC. Across government, employees caught wasting time at work say they simply didn’t have enough work to do, according to records obtained under the Freedom of Information Act…Investigations at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Commerce Department and the General Services Administration have turned up similar cases, though memos show the employees rarely face criminal prosecutions for time and attendance fraud.”

When Governor Perry of Texas self-destructed in the Republican primaries of 2008 by flubbing a simple question about what three federal agencies he would eliminate, he should have responded “just three?” He then could have gotten more specific by listing three of the agencies involved in the federal government’s Internet porn investigations: the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Commerce Department, and the General Services Administration (an agency that exists only because the government has grown too large to manage). If bureaucrats in these agencies have no work to do and can, therefore, spend their days watching Internet porn, not only should the employees in question be fired, the agencies themselves should be shut down.

The problem of no work to do is not limited to just the agencies listed above, and the ways federal bureaucrats spend their time on the job is not limited to Internet porn. According to McElhatton, “In a more recent and far more costly example, U.S. Patent Trial and Appeal Board paralegals received salaries and bonuses for years even though they spent much of their time watching television, shopping online, exercising and wasting time on their tablet computers, according to an investigation released this week by the Commerce Department’s inspector general. Investigators estimate that more than $4 million was spent paying employees for time they weren’t working.” That is $4 million for a Board that is just a very small part of a much larger federal agency, an agency that is just one of a long list of agencies that make up the federal bureaucracy.

Fraud, waste, and abuse, have become synonymous with federal government bureaucracies, a situation that liberals deny in spite of the facts and that the American public seems willing to ignore during times of economic prosperity. This willingness to turn a blind eye to an ever-expanding, increasingly costly federal government is wrong-headed in the best of times. But during times of economic distress when the average American is struggling to make ends meet, it is unconscionable.

Bored bureaucrats who spend their time on the job watching Internet porn, shopping online, playing games on their tablet computers, and watching television because they have no work to do is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to fraud, waste, and abuse in the federal government. The federal government has become a growth industry in America. Federal bureaucracies maintain their relative importance in the government hierarchy by being big and getting even bigger. Consequently, not only are there bored, idle employees who need to be fired, there are entire government agencies that need to be eliminated.

While America’s economy has been shrinking and workforce participation in the private sector constricting, the federal government has continued to grow. In fact, the most growth to be found in America’s workforce is in government. Yet with the counterbalancing loss of jobs in the private sector we have fewer and fewer people working and paying taxes to support our burgeoning government, a government that condones employees spending their days engaged in time wasting activities out of shear boredom because they have no work to do. To contemplate what the federal government has become is to walk through the looking glass with Alice as she tries to make sense out of Wonderland.