In the business of coupling, procreating and child rearing, the woman reigns supreme. Therefore, if you influence women, you influence the very fabric of society. This is why feminism has been such an important weapon in the armament of the left.

It’s time to say what no one else will: feminism didn’t result in equality between the sexes; it resulted in mass confusion. It tore apart the family and turned men feminine.

More than that, hundreds of millions of women have been raised in a society that eschews marriage. The complementary nature of marriage- in which two people work together, as equals, toward the same goal but with an appreciation for the qualities each gender brings to the table- has been obliterated. Life itself has been devalued. Rather than carry peace, it has caused division.

We have now discovered that there is indeed one worse place (maybe) to be than on the business end of a Chuck Norris roundhouse kick: a feminist slap-down of psychology, biology, nature and family values. In fact, the latter has been so scorned, that we are left with neither family nor values.

Feminist scholarship maintains that the term “family” supports women’s oppression because it contains class, cultural and heterosexual biases. What a crock. Family is pre-political.

A feminist and her coastal lib cabal will also tell you a man’s diary entry would read: “Got up and stood in front of the mirror. Slicked back my hair, slapped each bicep and said, “Beater on, guns out. ‘Merica, let’s do this.”

Or: “Woke up chained to a camo recliner in the bed of my truck, bucknaked with a ‘Merican flag stapled to my chest. Threw lightenin’ bolts at terrorists. Maybe I’ve had too many cocktails, but I think I just saw a pink kangaroo go by with Randy Travis shotgunnin’ beers in its pouch.”

But, I digress. American exceptionalism is directly threatened by feminism. Not just America’s social institutions, conventions and traditional families but in its culture of success.

See, the damage of feminism extends even further. For their cause wasn’t only feministic; it feminized. It emasculated. It birthed the triumph of feelings over achievement; the embrace of the tie and the trophy. It spawned the hostage-taking culture of sensitivity and victimhood. It aided and abetted the cause to declare there to be no winners and losers; just winners. It strived to hurt or limit the successful. It also is the same thinking that sees evil as relative; plastic bags today are as bad as North Korea, if not worse.

Which American kid grows up dreaming of being Vice President? Who remembers who came second in the hundred yard dash at the Olympics last year? No one. In America, more than anywhere else: you’re first or you’re last. And yet the feminist cause has sought and continues to seek to convert men to pussycats. In the militaristic culture of America, this spells disaster. It is as the great Eric Bolling of FNC’s The Five calls it: “the wussification of American men”.

I don’t know about anybody else but I still prefer and respect the coach who works himself up so much his players are worried he might get a stroke and responds by yelling: “I don’t get strokes, I give ‘em!!”

Feminism has made competition suspect. It has interfered with nature. It devastated the family. It created a war against men. It is at the heart of political correctness. It confused everyone. And it has weakened our society, particularly America. This should not be and is not about men versus women. Left to nature, men love women and women love men for they were made to complement each other. Even the timing of their sex drives are complementary. Gender is not a social construct; it’s biological.

It is entirely politically incorrect for a man to express these sentiments. But it is the truth. And outspoken men are unfairly maligned. Some of us want to be men. We want that choice. We love and admire the women around us. But we see the damage being wrought by feminism.

With her passing still fresh, here is a thought: young ladies should look to the late Baroness Margaret Thatcher for a model. Problem is most feminists today think the Iron Curtain is some form of birth protection. Thatcher was a real feminist. Not for what she said but for what she did. No combative rhetoric about equal rights or academic analysis about whether men and women are the same, or whether women are better. If feminists had been more like Thatcher, there would be many more female leaders yielding positive cultural effect.

As the UK Prime Minister famously said: “Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell someone you are; then you aren’t.”