The pro-abortion media crowd is embracing new ally in their fight: Satanists.

“Mary” from Missouri is hoping to bypass her state’s 72-hour abortion waiting period by citing “sincerely held religious beliefs” – as a Satanist. The Friendly Atheist blog broke the story of how the Satanic Temple plans to aid a woman it calls Mary who believes in its “tenets.” The media followed suit, from a Think Progress editor expressing “love,” to a Salon editor concluding, “[R]eligious exemption laws are maybe cool when Satanists use them to get abortions.”

Damien Ba’al, the head of the Satanic Temple’s St. Louis chapter, described his group’s “Project Mary.”

“This is about a human being who has rights to control her own body and a right to her religious beliefs,” he said on the GoFundMe page raising money for Mary’s transportation to the St. Louis Planned Parenthood, lodging and daycare for her (born) child.

“Myself and the rest of the St. Louis chapter of the Satanic Temple will be helping her circumvent these obstacles,” he said, because, “according to our tenets, one’s body is inviolable, subject to one’s own will alone.”

According to the Friendly Atheist, Mary will challenge her doctor in a letter “as an adherent to the principles of the Satanic Temple” to contest the waiting period. As a part of that community, she will outline her “sincerely held religious beliefs:”

“My body is inviolable and subject to my will alone.”
“I make any decisions regarding my health based on the best scientific understanding of the world, even if the science does not comport with the religious or political beliefs of others.”
My invaluable body includes any fetal or embryonic tissue I carry so long as that tissue is unable to survive outside my body as an independent human being.”
“I, and I alone, decide whether my invaluable body remains pregnant and I may, in good conscience, disregard the current or future condition of any fetal or embryonic tissue I carry in making that decision.”

Lucien Greaves, head of the Satanic Temple confirmed those beliefs.

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