Barack Obama and his minions in the administration as well as many Democrats in the Congress are often described as Socialists, or in the extreme as Marxists.  However, their actions and strategy are straight out of the fascist economic playbook.  They have become the modern reincarnation of the fascist mindset, without the militarism of Italy and Germany, that dominated Europe in the 1920s and ’30s.

Over the past seventy years, the left and their allies in the media have succeeded in labeling fascism as a right-wing or conservative philosophy when it in reality was an offshoot of socialism.  Socialism/Marxism seeks the total control of a society’s economy through complete state control of the means of production and income.  Fascism seeks that same control, indirectly by the state domination of private ownership, as well as controlling individual income and wealth through taxation and regulation.  Jonah Goldberg’s masterpiece Liberal Fascism convincingly demonstrates the progressive roots of fascism.

Per Sheldon Richman in the Concise Encyclopedia of Economics:

As an economic system, fascism is socialism with a capitalistic veneer.  In its day (the 1920’s and 1930’s), fascism was seen as the happy medium between boom-and-bust-prone capitalism, with its alleged class conflict, wasteful competition, and profit-oriented egoism, and Marxism, with its violent socially divisive prosecution of the bourgeoisie.

Where socialism abolished all market relations outright, fascism left the appearance of market relations while planning all economic activities.  Where socialism abolished money and prices; fascism controlled the monetary system and set all prices and wages politically.  [Emphasis added.]

ObamaCare is not about health care, per se; rather, it is intended to dictate to business and the individual what insurance they must buy, what health care they are allowed to access, and ultimately what behavior is acceptable — all at the whim of a centralized bureaucracy. The Dodd-Frank Bill firmly establishes the concept of “too big to fail” for certain financial institutions, thereby subjecting them to the absolute control of the state while allowing, and in many cases forcing, others to cease doing business, as well as instituting lending and operating policies determined by government regulators.

Continue reading →